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Directions to Bayville Primary 

Long Island Expressway (LIE) to Exit 41-N Oyster Bay or Northern State Parkway Exit 35 N

Take Route 106 N. 5 miles into Oyster Bay

Turn Left onto Lexington Avenue (Hess Station) on left to 2nd light. 

Turn Left onto West Main Street

Follow this street as it becomes West Shore Road, along Oyster Bay and over the Bayville Bridge to traffic light

Turn Left onto Bayville Avenue to first traffic light

Turn Left onto Mountain Avenue

Turn Right at the Intermediate School onto Godfrey Avenue.  The building is at the first left at the top of the hill.  

Kindergarten Celebrations!

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Tears of joy and pride rolled down the faces of kindergarten parents as they watched their children celebrate the completion of their first year of school. At Ann MacArthur Primary School and Bayville Primary School, kindergarteners dressed in their best clothes smiled big and sang songs about growing up.

Classroom teachers and music teachers worked together to help the children perform for their families in the schools’ multipurpose rooms. Although there are still officially a few days left of school, when the singing was done, the children were congratulated for completing kindergarten.

See the slideshow below for photos from both schools.

BP Students Perform and Remind: Nobody Stands Alone

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Second-graders in Carolyn Morales’ class at Bayville Primary School took to the stage to present an adorable version of “The Cheese Stands Alone.” The musical production shared an important lesson about standing up for what you believe in and being a good friend.

The performances from the young actors were convincing as they played the roles of the cat, the farmer, the wife and several varieties of cheese, among other notable characters. With six musical numbers included, the show had everyone tapping their feet along to the beat.

The students were able to shine with the help of many staff members from art and music teachers to the custodial staff and most importantly the dedication of Mrs. Morales.

 

Fair Focuses on STEM

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A second-grade class at Bayville Primary School recently worked to complete challenges using the STEM skills they learned throughout the year. Each challenge involved various aspects of each STEM subject – science, technology, engineering and mathematics. 

Working collaboratively in pairs, the students in Dani Schatz’s class used trial and error, failing at times and discovering that their mistakes were helping to lead them to success. How to drop an egg without it breaking, making a working roller coaster, building a fast-traveling bus and developing a structure that could float were among the many projects the class completed and then presented at their STEM Fair held in the school’s multipurpose room.

Ms. Schatz said the students worked on smaller challenges throughout the year, building up their skills and then bringing everything they learned together for a bigger project that they worked on for a longer period of time. For the STEM fair, the young scientists created posterboards describing their projects, which incorporated other parts of the curriculum such as vocabulary, writing, art and public speaking, that the children presented to the parents and students who visited each booth.

“The goal of this aspect of the project was for students to learn how to present information clearly and concisely, as well as summarize their experience,” Ms. Schatz said. “Students also had to take into account the audience they were presenting to. They knew that they would present information differently to their parents than they would to a kindergartner.”

Bayville Elementary Schools Assistant Principal Dorothy McManus said the STEM fair brought many aspects of the second-grade curriculum together beautifully. “The students honed their skills in many areas, learning that the subjects we teach them all interconnect.”

 

 

Memorial Day Salute

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Elementary students gave patriotic tributes that showed that they truly understand the meaning of Memorial Day and the importance of honoring our country’s veterans.

Students and staff from Ann MacArthur Primary School and Locust Valley Intermediate School gathered together at AMP to show their respect and to listen to words of wisdom from a local veteran.  Joe Rydzewski shared stories of his time in the military and encouraged students to appreciate the freedoms they have because of soldiers that work to protect the United States of America.

Bayville Primary School and Bayville Intermediate School students and staff walked to Bayville Village Hall for their Memorial Day ceremony. Veterans in attendance were honored for their service.

Decked out in red, white and blue, carrying American flags and performing patriotic songs, children at both events proved that they care about our veterans and that they appreciate the sacrifices these men and women have made. The bands and orchestra from both intermediate schools made the events more festive, while still respecting that this holiday commemorates those that were lost while serving the country in the armed forces. Students placed flowers at the base of the flagpoles and played taps as is customary at military memorial services.

Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Anna F. Hunderfund and Board of Education trustee Margaret Marchand attended both ceremonies. Nassau County Legislator Josh Lafazan attended the Bayville event and told the children that because of our veterans, they have the freedom to live the American dream.

We wish everyone a safe Memorial Day weekend and send our thanks to all of our country’s veterans.

Using Their Senses to Improve Their Skills

Two students dig through rice to fine objects

Little hands dug through a rice bath, tiny fingers painted with chocolate pudding and entire bodies crawled through a tunnel during a celebration of Sensory Awareness Day at Bayville Primary School. An array of sensory-based activities provided students with opportunities to experience the benefits of sensory stimulation.

Occupational therapist Dr. Doreit S. Bailer created a sensory awareness room where children rotated through multiple stations that required them to use their senses to complete various tasks. “Multisensory environments improve the development of thought, intelligence and social skills, offering those with cognitive impairments and other challenging conditions the opportunity to enjoy and control a variety of sensory experiences,” Dr. Bailer said. She added that multisensory environments generate a relaxing and calming effect and activate different perception areas aimed at basal stimulation for those that are neurologically impaired.

A tub filled with rice contained hidden objects that children had to find using not only their sense of touch, but also their vision to look at cards identifying the objects they needed to find. Crawling through a giant tunnel helped them gain spatial awareness of their own bodies in relationship to the environment. Using their fingers to create artistic designs in shaving cream was not only fun but helped improve fine motor skills. Pinching, pouring and lacing movements are also common ways to build fine motor skills, such as when participants pinched chopsticks to sort a bowl of foam pieces by color.

Bayville Primary School Assistant Principal Dorothy McManus said the activities these students experienced during the sensory awareness program provided them many benefits. “The children thought it was a fun, special event and the benefits they gained were a bonus.”