skip to main content

 

High School Library Information Center

Welcome!

The Locust Valley High School Library offers a wide range of resources for your research and class assignments, as well as a large collection of print and e-books for your reading enjoyment. Stop by the library and take advantage of all we have to offer.



 


Love to read e-books on your kindle, ipad or phone?

Download the OverDrive app and check out our collection of downloadable e-books at OverDrive.  

See a member of the library staff for your username and password.



Locust Valley High School Library has been recognized by New York State as a "LEADER" Electronic Doorway Library!

 

99 Horse Hollow Road Locust Valley, NY 11560
516-277-5185
Library Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30 AM - 3:30 PM


Ms. Barbara Mierlak, Library Information Specialist
 Mrs. Teresa Scutifero  Library Assistant

Mrs. Nicole Kay, Library Assistant

Mrs. Jennifer Caracciolo, Secretary


For Interlibrary Loan, please e-mail Ms Mierlak.

 

Seniors: Order Your Cap & Gown

Senior cap and gown orders will be taken on Wednesday, Jan. 30 from 10 a.m -1:30 p.m. outside the high school cafeteria. Please see the attached flyers for details.

Attachments:

Wrestlers Shine at Eastern States Classic

easternstatesphotoweb.jpg

Five varsity wrestlers participated in the Eastern States Classic, one of the toughest and most prestigious wrestling tournaments in the country, from Jan. 11-12 in Loch Sheldrake, New York. Anthony Scicutella (99), Kyle Shriberg (106), Jack Croke (106), Vincent Marchand (120) and Gage DeNatale (132), competed with wrestlers from 174 teams and nine different states.

 

Gage started day one of the tournament with two decisive wins. He dominated his first opponent and recorded a technical-fall (16-0) in the first period. Gage continued his dominant performance with an 18-7 major decision over his second opponent. He began the second day of the tournament by upsetting the No. 1 seeded wrestler in his bracket, with a 3-2 decision, in an intense quarterfinal match-up. During the semifinal match, Gage recorded his first loss of the season to one of the top-ranked Division II wrestlers in New York State. However, Gage was able to conquer one of the most difficult challenges in the sport of wrestling and grind his way through the wrestle-backs to end his tournament with a victory. In dramatic fashion, he defensively pinned the No. 3 seeded wrestler in his bracket to place fifth in the 132-pound weight class. Gage’s success is not a surprise and his tireless work ethic ensures that he will be a force to be reckoned with during the New York State championship tournament in February in Albany, New York. 

 

Despite not making it onto the podium, Locust Valley’s other four participants wrestled at a high level against the best competition available. The experience these wrestlers gained from entering and competing in this kind of tournament will prepare them to reach their individual goals in the postseason, as well as help Locust Valley defend its title as Division II county champions.

 

Congratulations to all of the wrestlers!

 

 

 

High School Career Fair - March 19

Save the Date!

The high school will host a career fair on March 19. Details to follow.

Attachments:

Pajamas, Slippers and Toy Drive

The high school's Interact Club is collecting pajamas, slippers and toys for the Matthew Fetzer Foundation. Donations can be placed in the box outside the high school main office. See attached flyer for details.

Attachments:

On Your Mark, Get Set ... Calculate!

MathRacesweb.png

It was a race to the finish, with four teams of competitors vying for points. But this competition wasn’t taking place on a field or a court and there were no balls, bats or racquets. Instead, the playing field was a whiteboard and players were armed with markers and calculators. It was a race to solve three-by-three systems of equations.

High school math teacher Angela Manzo set up the math races for the first few days back to school after the winter recess, to help get students energized to learn after the break. Ms. Manzo’s Algebra 2 classes solved a problem with three mathematical equations as teams, working collaboratively to determine each step of the solution. Standing at the whiteboard, team members took turns calculating portions of the problem and handing off the next step to their teammates. Each team had a different problem to solve and points were awarded based on finishing times. The team with the most points after the period was over was the winner.

“Sometimes students feel isolated at their desks solving mathematical equations,” Ms. Manzo said. “This gave them the opportunity to bounce ideas off of each other and understand that math does not need to be a solitary experience.”

The three-by-three equations are important for those thinking about careers in coding or video design, among others. According to Ms. Manzo, these problems help to calculate width, length, height and depth for three-dimensional designs, including the programming of 3D printers and the latest video games.